xysciences:

Wallace-Bolyai-Gerwien theory is the theory that any two polygons are equidecomposable. 
That is that one can be cut into finitely many polygon pieces and be rearranged to obtain the second polygon. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

Wallace-Bolyai-Gerwien theory is the theory that any two polygons are equidecomposable. 

That is that one can be cut into finitely many polygon pieces and be rearranged to obtain the second polygon. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

(via proto-jp-randomlikes)

@2 days ago with 7343 notes
yournineleafclover:

Donato Bramante, Tempietto, c. 1502, San Pietro in Montorio, Rome
@2 days ago with 12 notes
theantidote:

The Madonna (adapted) from Sandro Botticelli's Madonna

theantidote:

The Madonna (adapted) from Sandro Botticelli's Madonna

@2 days ago with 45 notes

design-is-fine:

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, chair Model 90, 1929. Hand-forged steel, hemp. Metal work: Joseph Müller, made by Berliner Metallgewerbe, Germany. Via Cooper Hewitt

(Source: collection.cooperhewitt.org, via uekou77)

@2 days ago with 183 notes
k15h1:

Tobias Faisst

k15h1:

Tobias Faisst

(Source: tobias-faisst)

@3 days ago with 79 notes
@3 days ago with 28725 notes
artaddictsanonymous:

Leon Battista Alberti, Palazzo Rucellai (Florence, Italy), left five bays 1455-58; later extended but never completed

artaddictsanonymous:

Leon Battista Alberti, Palazzo Rucellai (Florence, Italy), left five bays 1455-58; later extended but never completed

(Source: wga.hu, via dhmsiftings)

@4 days ago with 22 notes
hominisaevum:

In Classical architecture, a giant order is an order whose columns or pilasters span two (or more) stories. At the same time, smaller orders may feature in arcades or window and door framings within the storeys that are embraced by the giant order.
One of the earliest uses of this feature was at the Basilica di Sant’Andrea di Mantova (pictured above), designed by Leon Battista Alberti and begun in 1472. 

hominisaevum:

In Classical architecture, a giant order is an order whose columns or pilasters span two (or more) stories. At the same time, smaller orders may feature in arcades or window and door framings within the storeys that are embraced by the giant order.

One of the earliest uses of this feature was at the Basilica di Sant’Andrea di Mantova (pictured above), designed by Leon Battista Alberti and begun in 1472. 

(Source: studyblue.com, via dhmsiftings)

@4 days ago with 75 notes
acidadebranca:

San Pietro in Montorio is a church in Rome, Italy, which includes in its courtyard the Tempietto, a small commemorative martyrium(tomb) built by Donato Bramante.
The Church of San Pietro in Montorio was built on the site of an earlier 9th-century church dedicated to Saint Peter on Rome’sJaniculum hill. According to tradition, it was the site of his crucifixion.
In the 15th century, the ruins were given to the Amadist friars, a reform branch of the Franciscans, founded by the Blessed Amadeus of Portugal, who served as confessor to Pope Sixtus IV from 1472. Commissioned by Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain.
It is a titular church, whose current title holder, since 1 March 2008, is Cardinal James Francis Stafford.
The so-called Tempietto (Italian: “small temple”) is a small commemorative tomb (martyrium) built by Donato Bramante, possibly as early as 1502, in the courtyard of San Pietro in Montorio. Also commissioned by Ferdinand and Isabella, the Tempietto is considered a masterpiece of High Renaissance Italian architecture.
After spending his first years in Milan, Bramante moved to Rome, where he was recognized by Cardinal Giuliano della Rovere, the soon-to-be Pope Julius II. In Rome, Bramante, was able to study the ancient monuments first hand. The temple of Vesta at Tivoli was one of the precedents behind the Tempietto. Other antique precedents Bramante was able to study in Rome include the circular temple of the banks of the Tiber, believed to be a temple of Vesta. However, the centrally planned church was employed by early Christians for martyriums, an example being Santa Constanza, also in Rome. Bramante would have been aware of these early Christian precedents, and as a result, the Tempietto is circular.
The “Tempietto” is one of the most harmonious buildings of the Renaissance. It is the earliest example of use of the Tuscan order in the Renaissance. Tuscan is a form of the Doric order which stated by Vitruvius is the relationship between the Order and the nature of the divinity to whom the temple is dedicated to. A Doric order is well suited for strong male gods (such as Hercules) so Tuscan was well suited for St. Peter. It is meant to mark the traditional exact spot of St. Peter’s martyrdom, and is an important precursor to Bramante’s rebuilding of St. Peter’s.
Given all the transformations of Renaissance and Baroque Rome that were to follow, it is hard now to sense the impact this building had at the beginning of the 16th century. It is almost a piece of sculpture, for it has little architectonic use. The building greatly reflected Brunelleschi’s style. Perfectly proportioned, it is composed of slender Tuscan columns, a Doric entablature modeled after the ancientTheater of Marcellus, and a dome. According to an engraving in Sebastiano Serlio's Book III, Bramante planned to set it in within a colonnaded courtyard, but this plan was never executed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Pietro_in_Montorio

acidadebranca:

San Pietro in Montorio is a church in RomeItaly, which includes in its courtyard the Tempietto, a small commemorative martyrium(tomb) built by Donato Bramante.

The Church of San Pietro in Montorio was built on the site of an earlier 9th-century church dedicated to Saint Peter on Rome’sJaniculum hill. According to tradition, it was the site of his crucifixion.

In the 15th century, the ruins were given to the Amadist friars, a reform branch of the Franciscans, founded by the Blessed Amadeus of Portugal, who served as confessor to Pope Sixtus IV from 1472. Commissioned by Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain.

It is a titular church, whose current title holder, since 1 March 2008, is Cardinal James Francis Stafford.

The so-called Tempietto (Italian: “small temple”) is a small commemorative tomb (martyrium) built by Donato Bramante, possibly as early as 1502, in the courtyard of San Pietro in Montorio. Also commissioned by Ferdinand and Isabella, the Tempietto is considered a masterpiece of High Renaissance Italian architecture.

After spending his first years in Milan, Bramante moved to Rome, where he was recognized by Cardinal Giuliano della Rovere, the soon-to-be Pope Julius II. In Rome, Bramante, was able to study the ancient monuments first hand. The temple of Vesta at Tivoli was one of the precedents behind the Tempietto. Other antique precedents Bramante was able to study in Rome include the circular temple of the banks of the Tiber, believed to be a temple of Vesta. However, the centrally planned church was employed by early Christians for martyriums, an example being Santa Constanza, also in Rome. Bramante would have been aware of these early Christian precedents, and as a result, the Tempietto is circular.

The “Tempietto” is one of the most harmonious buildings of the Renaissance. It is the earliest example of use of the Tuscan order in the Renaissance. Tuscan is a form of the Doric order which stated by Vitruvius is the relationship between the Order and the nature of the divinity to whom the temple is dedicated to. A Doric order is well suited for strong male gods (such as Hercules) so Tuscan was well suited for St. Peter. It is meant to mark the traditional exact spot of St. Peter’s martyrdom, and is an important precursor to Bramante’s rebuilding of St. Peter’s.

Given all the transformations of Renaissance and Baroque Rome that were to follow, it is hard now to sense the impact this building had at the beginning of the 16th century. It is almost a piece of sculpture, for it has little architectonic use. The building greatly reflected Brunelleschi’s style. Perfectly proportioned, it is composed of slender Tuscan columns, a Doric entablature modeled after the ancientTheater of Marcellus, and a dome. According to an engraving in Sebastiano Serlio's Book III, Bramante planned to set it in within a colonnaded courtyard, but this plan was never executed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Pietro_in_Montorio

(Source: rockthrower)

@2 days ago with 19 notes
doriquecestchic:

Bramante
Santa Maria della Pace
Grid
c. 1500
Rome

doriquecestchic:

Bramante

Santa Maria della Pace

Grid

c. 1500

Rome

(via acidadebranca)

@2 days ago with 15 notes
nobore:

Rietveld cabinet. 1919

nobore:

Rietveld cabinet. 1919

(via uekou77)

@2 days ago with 166 notes
k15h1:

Tobias Faisst

k15h1:

Tobias Faisst

(Source: tobias-faisst)

@3 days ago with 48 notes
k15h1:

Tobias Faisst

k15h1:

Tobias Faisst

(Source: tobias-faisst)

@3 days ago with 347 notes
thecwst:

Michael Chase
@4 days ago with 602 notes
artaddictsanonymous:

Leon Battista Alberti, Nave of the Church of Sant’Andrea (Mantua, Italy), designed 1470

artaddictsanonymous:

Leon Battista Alberti, Nave of the Church of Sant’Andrea (Mantua, Italy), designed 1470

(Source: wga.hu, via dhmsiftings)

@4 days ago with 30 notes